First Training at Rawson Brook Farm Monterey, MA

Springtime is here, finally.

As I wrap up college, all I can think about is moving to the Berkshires where I’ll be working this summer and fall. I’m blessed with a warm welcome from the baby goats, Susan and her employees, and a cozy cabin.

Baby Goats are Playful

Baby Goats are Playful

I had my first training at Rawson Brook Farm this weekend. I showed up with no expectations or prior experience and before I knew it I was herding goats to the barn, hanging cheese, milking 40 mamas, and feeding 20 kids.

That’s one way to learn a new skill! I think I took in more information in one day than I have in a semester of college. 

Susan shows me how to milk goats

Susan shows me how to milk goats

Every goat has a name. Susan tells me the stories behind each one as she places the milking machine on their udders. I was able to learn the technique very quick, as it takes a few days for some people. 

There is quite the rhythm to the whole process.

Hanging Cheese

Hanging Cheese

 

 

 

 

This time of year when the goats start milking after kidding, the cheese is really rich. I tried a dab before it gets put into the refrigerator and it was phenomenal. The cheese hangs overnight to release the whey.

 

 

Glynnis Packing Cheese

Glynnis Packing Cheese

 

 

 

 

The next morning we mix it with salt and herbs. The flavors: thyme and olive oil, chives, and plain. It goes right into the fridge where customers buy it directly. We  also ship it to restaurants and stores in Great Barrington, Boston, Hadley, and New York.

 

 

The nearest place to Northampton is Hadley Whole Foods. Or come visit the farm. 

They can't seem to hold still for this shot, it's just too exciting

They can't seem to hold still for this shot, it's just too exciting

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “First Training at Rawson Brook Farm Monterey, MA

  1. Can’t wait to visit and savour the cheese! I know your experience there will be powerful and I hope fun along with all the hard work. Your farming for justice blog was great–a very wholistic approach to life. You set an example for all of us!

  2. Hi, cool post. I have been wondering about this issue,so thanks for writing. I’ll probably be subscribing to your blog. Keep up great writing

  3. Pingback: 2010 in review | Farming for Justice

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